Northern German New Year’s Traditions

The Pagan Beanstalk

by Týra Sahsnotasvriunt

WHY IS NEW YEAR’S CALLED SILVESTER IN GERMAN?

pope

Since the introduction of the Gregorian calendar in 1582 the last day of the year has been named after the Roman Catholic pope Silvester (Lat. silva = forest, silvester = forest (hu)man), who had died on December 31st, 335 in Rome.
For some reason most people pronounce it “Sylvester” (y = ü) rather than Silvester up here though.
Like most Catholic clerics pope Silvester was an incredibly degenerate and cruel man. He was known for torturing Pagans resisting to be baptized to death by forcing them to eat fishbones.

RUMMELPOTT & MASQUERADE

Rummelpott

I already mentioned the North Frisian variant of Rummelpott (“noisy pot”) in https://paganmeltingpot.wordpress.com/2015/01/25/pagan-remnants-of-north-frisian-holiday-celebrations-and-customs-19th-21st-century/.
However in most of the rest of Northern Germany the children put on costumes and masks,  so that the spirits of the old year would not recognize them and try to pass over into…

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Vikings wanted!! Volunteer crew needed for Expedition America 2016 – no murder or pillage included

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Their amazing ships enabled a few hundred thousand Scandinavians to shape world history.
They were the first great world explorers in the western hemisphere.  Most of western Europe has a Viking heritage of one sort or another. The Dragon Harald Fairhair  is a large Viking longship built in the municipality ofHaugesund, Norway. The Dragon Harald Fairhair brings the seafaring qualities of a warship from the old Norse sagas to life. It is a ship that combines ocean-crossing sailing capabilities with a warship’s use of oars.

Construction and maiden voyage

The Vikings left almost no record of how they built their ships and how they sailed them.

Building began in March 2010. The launching of the longship took place in the summer 2012. Because no one today has real experience handling a Viking ship of this size, the initial period will be one of exploring how to sail and row the ship, and for experimentation with the rigging along the coast of Norway. In summer 2014 the longship made its first real expedition from Norway to Liverpool Victoria Rowing Club, Wallasey, Wirral, Merseyside, and back via various locations around the coast of the British Isles including the Isle of Man, Western Isles, Orkney and Shetland.

Read more here.

Haggis originally brought to Scotland by Vikings, an award winning Scottish butcher argues

slatur

ICELANDIC “SLÁTUR” A Scottish butcher argues the Scottish national dish, Haggis, was originally brought to Scotland by Vikings, making it a descendant of the Viking delicacy still eaten in Iceland, slátur. Photo/Arnþór Birkisson.

A Scottish butcher who has spent the past few years researching Haggis recipes argues it dates back to the Viking invaders of the British Isles the UK newspaper The Telegraph reports. The paper argues the research of award-winning Scottish butcher Joe Callaghan, who has spent the last three years studying haggis shows “Scotland’s national dish is an ‘imposter’… invented by Vikings”. Callaghan also argues the original Scottish ingredient is deer, not sheep.

The “natonal dish of Scotand”, invented by Vikings
Haggis is a dish very similar to the Icelandic delicacy slátur: A sausage made by stuffing a sheep’s stomach with diced innards of sheep, liver as well as lungs and heart, mixed with a oatmeal, onion, pieces of sheep suet (solid white fat) as well as seasoning. Haggis is considered the “national dish” of Scotland, occupying an important place in Scottish culture and national identity.

Read more here.