Happy Sigrblót!

Tomorrow the Folk celebrate Sigrblót or Sumarsdag. The prechristian Icelanders considered tomorrow as the first day of Summer.

So celebrate Sumarsdag with joy, but also make sacrifice to Sigföðr … a name of Odin recalling His role as the Father of Victory or the War Father.

You Might Have Heard … Viking Chief Buried in His Boat Found in Scotland

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Reconstruction of what the burial site unearthed at Ardnamurchan might have looked like. (Credit: Geoff Robinson)

The first intact Viking boat burial site to be found on the British mainland was discovered recently in Scotland, archaeologists announced. The grave contains the body of a Norse warrior thought to have been a chieftain or other high-ranking figure, lying with his weapons by his side in the remains of a rotted ship. He was likely interred during a ritualized pagan ceremony roughly 1,000 years ago, according to the researchers.

Read more here.

OCTOBER 19, 2011

View From Space Hints at a New Viking Site in North America – New York Times

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Douglas Bolender, left, and Sarah H. Parcak, right, looking for evidence of a Viking presence in Point Rosee, Newfoundland. If confirmed, the site would be the second known Viking settlement in North America.  Credit Greg Mumford

A thousand years after the Vikings braved the icy seas from Greenland to the New World in search of timber and plunder, satellite technology has found intriguing evidence of a long-elusive prize in archaeology — a second Norse settlement in North America, further south than ever known.

The new Canadian site, with telltale signs of iron-working, was discovered last summer after infrared images from 400 miles in space showed possible man-made shapes under discolored vegetation. The site is on the southwest coast of Newfoundland, about 300 miles south of L’Anse aux Meadows, the first and so far only confirmed Viking settlement in North America, discovered in 1960.

Since then, archaeologists, following up clues in the histories known as thesagas, have been hunting for the holy grail of other Viking, or Norse, landmarks in the Americas that would have existed 500 years before Columbus, to no avail.

But last year, Sarah H. Parcak, a leading space archaeologist working with Canadian experts and the science series NOVA for a two-hour television documentary, “Vikings Unearthed,” that will be aired on PBS next week, turned her eyes in the sky on coastlines from Baffin Island, west of Greenland, to Massachusetts. She found hundreds of potential “hot spots” that high-resolution aerial photography narrowed to a handful and then one particularly promising candidate — “a dark stain” with buried rectilinear features.

Read more here.

The Aurora Borealis … Disappearing?

Last chance to see the Northern Lights before they dim for a decade

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Gazing up at the northern lights often appears on travelers’ bucket lists, but after next year, they’re going to be much more difficult to see.

No, the aurora borealis isn’t disappearing, but it is expected to appear less frequently over the next decade.

The northern lights take place on an 11-year solar cycle.

Read more here.

Virtual Reality Theme Park Brings Norse Legends to Life

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Norse Theme Parks is blending traditional attractions with virtual reality and augmented reality experiences at its new Copenhagen park.

Theme parks around the world are beginning to incorporate virtual reality into their attractions, in addition to using it to design rides. There’s a VR theme park being built in China. And now a startup is building a Norse mythology virtual and augmented reality theme park in Copenhagen, Denmark.

According to Peter Franklin Wurtz, co-founder of startup Norse Theme Parks, The Legendary World of Norse Mythology: Yggdrasil will blend traditional rides and attractions with virtual reality and augmented reality experiences when it opens in 2019.

Read more here.

Mini Bourbon Caramelized Peach Baked Alaska with Butter Pecan Ice Cream

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Ingredients

  • No Churn Butter Pecan Ice Cream
  • 4 tablespoons salted butter
  • 1 1/2 cup raw pecans, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup or brown sugar
  • 2 cups heavy whipping cream
  • 1 (14 ounce) can sweetened condensed milk
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract

Meringue + Peaches

  • 6 large scoops butter pecan ice cream
  • 4 eggs whites
  • 1 cup granulated sugar
  • pinch of salt
  • 2 teaspoons vanilla extract, divided
  • 1/4 cup brown sugar
  • 1/2 teaspoon salt
  • 3 ripe, but firm peaches, halved + pits removed
  • 4 tablespoons butter, divided
  • 2 tablespoons bourbon (optional)

Crumble

  • 4 tablespoons butter
  • 1/2 cup old fashioned oats
  • 1/3 cup raw pecans, chopped
  • 1 tablespoon brown sugar
  • 1 tablespoon vanilla
  • 1/2 teaspoon cinnamon

Instructions

Ice Cream (OR USE STORE BOUGHT)

Melt the butter in a large skillet set over medium heat. Add the pecans and maple, cook until toasted + caramelized, about 5 minutes. Remove from the heat and and let cool.

Add the heavy cream, sweetened condensed milk and vanilla to the bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the whisk attachment (or use a hand held electric mixer). Whip until stiff peaks form. Fold in the cooled pecans and any butter left in the pan. Spoon the ice cream into a freezer safe container and freeze 6 hours or overnight.

Go here for the rest of this recipe.

Scientists Find Evidence of Prehistoric Massacre in Europe

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Photo released Monday Aug. 17, 2015 by researcher Christian Meyer shows the fractured skull of an about eight-years-old child with a digital mark to show the size. (Christian Meyer via AP)

 

BERLIN — Scientists say they have found rare evidence of a prehistoric massacre in Europe after discovering a 7,000-year-old mass grave with skeletal remains from some of the continent’s first farmers bearing terrible wounds.

Archaeologists who painstakingly examined the bones of some 26 men, women and children buried in the Stone Age grave site at Schoeneck-Kilianstaedten, near Frankfurt, say they found blunt force marks to the head, arrow wounds and deliberate efforts to smash at least half of the victims’ shins — either to stop them from running away or as a grim message to survivors.

“It was either torture or mutilation. We can’t say for sure whether the victims were still alive,” said Christian Meyer, one of the authors of the study published Monday in the journal Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences.

Meyer said the findings from Schoeneck-Kilianstaedten bolster theories put forward after the earlier discovery of two other grave sites in Germany and Austria. At all three sites, the victims and the perpetrators appeared to have been from the Linearbandkeramik — or LBK — culture, a farming people who arrived in central Europe about 5,500 B.C. Their name derives from the German phrase for “linear band ceramics,” a reference to the style of their pottery.

Read more here.

Happy Stikklestad Day

Today we celebrate the death of Olaf II Haraldsson, king of Norway. He was killed by Thorir Hund (Thorir the Hound) at the Battle of Stiklestad People have called Olaf by several different names. During his lifetime he was known as Olaf ‘the fat’ or ‘the stout’ or simply as Olaf ‘the big’ (Ólafr digri; Modern Norwegian Olaf digre). In Norway today, he is commonly referred to as Olav den hellige (Bokmål; Olaf the Holy) or Heilage-Olav (Nynorsk; the Holy Olaf) in honor of his sainthood.

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He was posthumously given the title Rex Perpetuus Norvegiae(English: Norway’s Eternal King) and canonised in Nidaros (Trondheim) by Roman Catholic Bishop Grimkell, one year after his death. His remains were enshrined in Nidaros Cathedral, built over his burial site.

 

In Heathenry he is known as Olaf the Lawbreaker.

So raise a horn and thank Thorir Hund for his love and devotion to the Gods by ending the life of such a blood-thirsty killer of his people.

Tore Hund Monument

The Tore Hund Monument, by Norwegian artist Svein Haavardsholm, was erected in 1980 beside the road to the church on Bjarkøy. The memorial honors both Thorir Hund and the Bjarkøy clan, who had their seat on Bjarkøy.

 

 

 

Neolithic house discovery at Avebury stone circle dig

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Archaeologists at the three-week Avebury dig are researching the daily lives of Neolithic and Bronze Age people

Archaeologists believe they may have found the remains of a house where people who built Avebury stone circle may have lived.

The three-week Between the Monuments project is researching the daily lives of Neolithic and Bronze Age residents at the Wiltshire site.

The dig is being led by The National Trust and Southampton and Leicester University archaeologists.

The National Trust said if it is a house they will have “hit the jackpot”.

Spokesman Dr Nick Snashall said: “I could count the number of middle Neolithic houses that have been found on the fingers of one hand.

“This site dates from a time when people are just starting to build the earliest parts of Avebury’s earthworks, so we could be looking at the home and workplace of the people who saw that happening.”

Read more here.